Where Are the CDL TRUCK Drivers? A State by State Analysis

Pop quiz time: What states produce the most truck driver applications?

 

Think you can guess the top 5? How about the top 10?

Using data we’ve collected over the last 12 months through our truck driver recruiting database and extensive recruiting network (including sites like hiring-drivers.com), let’s see where the drivers are in the U.S. of A.

First up, here’s a breakdown from the last year in terms of percentage of driver applications. If you are interested contact us to find out more about our driver recruiting services.

Over the last 12 months, the top 10 states producing the most driver apps have been:

1. Texas

2. Florida

3. California

4. Georgia

5. North Carolina

6. Alabama

7. Pennsylvania

8. New York

9. Louisiana

10. Ohio

Any surprises there?

We also sliced the data from the last six months and three months, respectively, to uncover possible outliers or to see if any states might be punching above their population weight in terms of driver volume.

Over the last six months, the top 10 states producing driver apps were as follows:

1. Florida 

2. Texas

3. Georgia

4. California

5. North Carolina

6. Alabama

7. Pennsylvania

8. New York

9. Ohio

10. Louisiana

Apex Call to Action

How about Florida? Big shout-out to my home state for representing with the highest volume of truck driver apps, and showing our ability to excel in things other than embarrassing news stories and manatee harassment incidents.

Other than Florida outpacing Texas, the top 10 from the last six months is about the same.

For the last three months, the 10 states producing the most apps look pretty familiar:

1. Florida

2. Texas

3. California

4. Georgia

5. North Carolina

6. Alabama

7. Pennsylvania

8. New York

9. Ohio

10. Louisiana

Takeaway

Across the board, for a whole year, we see the same states producing the most apps. It’s more than just a year-long trend, however.

These usual suspects sync with findings from Overdrive, which analyzed state-by-state driver application density from 2008-2015. According to that application density study (driver apps per capita, relative to a state’s population): “In the per-capita analysis, Deep-South states show some of the highest densities of CDL holders treading the waters for employment. Mississippi ranked the highest, but Wyoming further afield was not far behind. Vermont and Massachusetts, on the other hand, showed the lowest per-capita density of applicants. In terms of pure volume of applications, without the per-capita adjustment, densely populated states of Texas, Florida, California and Georgia, in that order, are at the top of the list.”
Source: Where Are the Drivers? A State by State Heat Map Analysis

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Trump Plans to Cut Billions From Transportation

 


President Trump’s proposed budget for 2018 will cut funding to the DOT by $2.4 billion – a 13% reduction in funding from the previous year. The DOT’s TIGER grants will be among the programs eliminated entirely.

The proposed budget is titled “America First: A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again.” It covers only areas on the federal budget which are categorized as “Discretionary spending.” These are budget items which must be re-approved by Congress every year and include categories like Defense, Homeland Security, Education, Justice, Labor, Trans
portation, and more.

If the proposed budget is approved, every agency except Veterans Affairs, Homeland Security, and the Department of Defense, would have their budgets cut to make room for a $52.3 billion increase in defense spending. While the Department of Education (-$9.2 billion), the State Department (-$10.9 billion), and the Department of Health and Human Services (-$12.6 billion) would receive the largest cuts, the Department of Transportation’s budget would also be cut by $2.4 billion, a reduction of 13% from the 2017 budget.

Not all DOT programs being cut have to do with roads and highways. For example, the proposed budget would eliminate a program that subsidizes commercial flights to and from rural airports – a move which may prove unpopular with rural Republicans and Democrats.

Of concern to the trucking industry however is the elimination of the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant program. The budget estimates that eliminating it would save $499 million. The reason given for eliminating the grants is that projects which are eligible for TIGER grants are “generally eligible for funding” by other programs.

TIGER grants take federal money and give it to states to spend on infrastructure projects. Past TIGER projects include truck parking initiatives such as a $25 million grant to eight Midwestern states to support truck driver parking. According to the DOT, $1.7 billion in TIGER grant money has gone toward projects that aim to directly benefit our nation’s roadways since 2009.

Mick Mulvaney, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, wrote in his forward to the proposal that this “is not the full Federal budget.” Instead Mulvaney referred to the document as a “blueprint” which would provide people “with a view of the priorities of the President and his Administration.”

According to the White House, if it were to move forward, President Trump’s promised infrastructure spending package would be separate from the current proposed DOT budget.

 

Source: Trump’s Budget Would Cut Billions From Transportation

Apex Call to Action

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Lost A Brother – RIP – Macy Lee Alvery

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Macy Lee Alvey II was a New Orleans tow truck driver whose mother described as a wonderful son.

“We text every morning, ‘Good morning, what’s going on?’ We send out prayers to each other,” explained Michael Charles who was friends with 34-year-old Macy Lee Alvey II.

“He would give you the shirt off his back if he could. He would go out of his way for whatever he needed to do for you no matter if he had to go without. He would help anybody” said Maria Alvey.

Investigators say Alvey was helping a disabled truck on I-55 north near mile marker 11.8 Thursday morning. He was standing on the driver side when a 2012 Nissan Rogue, driven by 48-year-old Mikela Hall, sideswiped the Chevy, tow truck, and Alvey before hitting the guard rail, flipping over and being hit by a 2008 Pontiac Grand Am.

The driver of the Pontiac was taken to North Oaks Hospital with critical injuries. Hall suffered moderate injuries, while Alvey was pronounced dead on the scene.  The driver of the Nissan Rogue, Mikela Hall, has been arrested for vehicular homicide, first-degree vehicular negligent injuring, failure to move over for an emergency vehicle, careless operation and suspended driver’s license.

“The problem that we have here is that there are laws out in place of move over. No one pays attention to that. Sometimes, I think they get drawn to the light,” said Charles.

And Charles knows the dangers that his friends faced while out of the side of that road helping that driver. In his tow yard the cab of a wrecked truck from when he himself was hit by a driver who didn’t move over.

Louisiana State patrol spokesperson Dustin Dwight said, “The law is very clear when it comes to this. You need to slow down or move into the other lane, it’s that simple.”

Louisiana State Troopers also suspect that Mikela Hall was driving impaired and said a blood sample has been taken for a toxicology test.

“It’s frustrating because these people are just doing their job. They’re just doing their job on the shoulder of the road and for somebody to just not care enough to move over, or pay attention, or impaired,” said Dustin Dwight.

Now Alvey’s friends and family a coping with the fact that he’s gone.

“That was a reality check,. ‘Wait a minute, man he’s never going to come. He’s dead,’” said Charles.

Trends In Recruiting

On the off chance that you are a proprietor head considering renting onto Landstar, now is the ideal time to inspect.

“The pay potential for proprietor heads at Landstar is surprising agreeable point. We’re encountering right around 32,000 accessible loads every day in the Landstar framework, yet have just 8,300 Landstar drivers to cover them” as showed by Shad Rockstad at Landstar KCL. “In Indiana alone, I see more than 500 weights paying above $3.00 per mile, of which 100 surpass $4.00 per mile, imagesafdfwhich is magnificent pay. If you’re as of now driving for an affiliation that pays a set rate for every mile, you’re leaving behind a noteworthy open door indeed.”

Landstar’s whole maritime power is incorporated drivers who declare their own particular trucks and draw either their own particular trailer or one gave by method for Landstar. Drivers search for and secure weights by getting to Landstar’s heap board framework, which is perpetually redesigned by more than 1000 free Landstar deals experts orchestrated in workplaces over the United States.

“Not just is the pay potential personality boggling, drivers can have 100% of the fuel additional charge and 33% of the line pull pay of the payload charge progressed to them before they get the stack. That is budgetary bolster you won’t discover wherever else” said Mark Welch, in like way with Landstar KCL and a 17 year veteran determination delegate. “Landstar’s a $3 billion affiliation, which gives them the budgetary quality to bolster its drivers in such a huge way.”

Landstar drivers, inside proposed as business cutoff proprietors, BCOs, are not paid by the mile, yet rather get a set rate of the line pull pay and 100% of the fuel additional charge. As rates go up, so does driver pay.

Luckily for Landstar, regardless of the 8,300 drivers it has pulling for them quite recently, they have trader bearer concurrences with more than 30,000 autonomous trucking affiliations transversely over North America. Every bearer meets or surpasses Landstar’s high least security and contraption necessities and is bore witness to pull Landstar load.